Why Eating Like a “Celebrity” Will Ruin Your Metabolism

Why Eating Like a “Celebrity” Will Ruin Your Metabolism

Why eating like a “celebrity” will ruin your metabolism

There was a time in my life, many, many years ago, that I used to buy into “celebrity” diets.  I’d pick up the current People or Us magazine and read how Oprah or some other celebrity had lost extreme amounts of weight–quickly.   The celebrity would claim that all they had to do was eat pre-packaged food, or consume a liquid-only diet, or eat a low calorie diet and/or take a magic supplement to drop pounds rapidly.  I would see the before and after pictures and think, “Wow, that diet really worked, look how fast they lost weight, and see how good they looked.”.

Both the celebrity and I would assume the diet really worked!

What you didn’t see or hear about was how the celebrity, three months later, was struggling to keep off the weight.  Then within the next 6 months to 2 years, the same celebrity would show up in People or Us magazine with all the weight back on confessing they had no will power and they had failed, once again, at keeping their weight down.  Oprah, it’s not you fault!!!

Oprah weight loss

How many of you have seen these headlines in a magazine, TV show, on the Internet or one of the other million of places you are marketed to?

*Learn how insert celebrity name here lost 10 pounds in 2 weeks.

*Or learn how insert celebrity name here lost her baby weight in 60 days.

*Or learn how insert celebrity name here got red-carpet ready.

The story above and all of these statements NOW irritate the crap out of me.  Why?  Because all of them are supporting a system of weight loss, that is not only unhealthy, but will do long term damage to your metabolism.   Celebrity diets are nothing but quick weight loss strategies designed for you to lose weight FAST. Right?  And isn’t this what most people want, to lose weight fast?  Yes!  Yet, although this is what people want, quick weight loss strategies are not supportive to long-term health or a HIGH metabolism.

When you lose weight FAST.  This is what is really going on…

1.  You are losing water

2.  You are losing muscle

3.  You are cleaning out your bowel

4.  You are depleting muscle glycogen

4.  You may lose a very small amount of fat

This is why quick weight loss strategies are ALWAYS followed by the weight returning, PLUS a pound or two more.  You see, when you lose weight FAST, most of the weight you lost is NOT fat; instead you are losing water weight, muscle, muscle glycogen, and the contents that are inside your intestines.  And to make things worse, since most quick weight loss strategies are calorie restrictive, nutrient restrictive, carbohydrate restrictive, protein restrictive, fat restrictive or some sort of combination of all or few of these, these types of deprivation diets are slowing down your metabolism.

How do restrictive diets slow down your metabolism?

Your body requires energy (food) and nutrients to function optimally.  Food to a human is like gas to a car.  Without gas your car will not run.  Just like without food, your body stops working properly.  Unlike a car, your body has a back up system in place just in case food is unavailable.  The sympathetic nervous system, referred to as your flight or fight system, allows your body to start using its own tissue (muscle, tissue, bone, thymus gland, fat), by releasing your stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline, in case food is not available so that you can stay alive.   This is a good thing for short-term survival, but NOT for long-term health.

When you deprive yourself of energy (food), your body starts slowing down metabolic functions to conserve energy.  These include, but are not limited to, digestion, detoxification, immune function, muscle growth and repair, brain function, circulation, hormonal production, and heat production.  When less energy is available, your thyroid slows down the production of thyroid hormones to conserve energy.  In addition, the liver needs adequate amounts of sugars (carbohydrates), protein and nutrients to complete thyroxine/T4 (inactive thyroid) to triiodothyronineT3 (active thyroid) conversion.  Lower levels of T3 will decrease cellular respiration telling the body to conserve more energy and decrease heat production and body functions.

As most of you know, celebrity diets do work in the short term.   Consuming less food and nutrients does help with weight loss.  Yet, give the celebrity 3-6 months, or even less time, and they will regain their lost weight and advertising something new for you to invest your hard earned money on.   Remember ALL restrictive diets DO NOT work—long term.  Although its possible to keep the weight off by restricting calories and nutrients, eventually anyone using this type of weight loss strategy will start to experience fatigue, agitation, cold, more susceptible to illness, constipated, sleep issues, hormonal issues, decreased muscle mass and/or thinking power.

What should you do for long-term weight loss?

Increase metabolic rate silly!

What do you need to do to increase metabolic rate? Here are five things you can do now that will help increase your metabolic rate.

1. Eat Real Food.  Consume the right fats, carbs and proteins, in the right amounts and frequencies that are right for you.

2. Rest and Sleep.  Sleep helps with mitochondria regeneration.  The mitochondria are the cells’ powerhouse and where cellular respiration takes place.

3. De-stress.  Stress suppresses metabolic rate and thyroid function.  Remove the stress; increase the thyroid and metabolic rate.

4. Move purposely.   Do movement exercises that you love and enjoy, and that make your body feel good.  You should move to increase muscle mass, flexibility, mobility, stability, strength and power, NOT for quick weight loss.

5. Be happy.  Figure out what you want out of life and go for it.  Happiness is far less stressful than being unhappy.

Bottom line:  Save your hard earned money and your time by avoiding all celebrity diets and ALL plans that produce QUICK weight loss results and guarantees. THEY just don’t work—long term!

If you want to find out how to really regain your health and lose weight forever, by improving your metabolic rate, then check out my new book, “How to Heal Your Metabolism.”

Your Optimal Health Coach,

Kate

 

 

Is Your Workout Making you Fat?

 

Is your workout making you fat?

Lately, I have been bombarded with calls and emails from women and men, who are doing tons of cardio AND gaining weight! Correct, they are doing loads of cardio exercise (1-3 hours day) and are gaining, not losing weight.

Is this possible? My first thought is, perhaps they are simply gaining muscle? Well, maybe? However, if they are doing tons of cardio, trust me when I tell you, this is NOT an anabolic workout (a muscle-building workout) this is a catabolic workout (a muscle-breakdown workout). Thus, a high amount of cardio usually results in muscle loss, not muscle gain. Have you ever seen a really muscular marathon runner? I certainly have not. Most elite marathon runners look emaciated. They are super lean yet have very little muscle. You see, long distance endurance activities are very catabolic. They end up breaking down muscle — not building it.

Over time, this means:

Lots of cardio=catabolism=Less muscle = lower metabolism = Fat gain

Most people think the opposite:

Lots of cardio = more calories burned = weight loss

Shouldn’t this be the right equation? Well, it would be, however, you are leaving out one very important component — hormones.

Lots of cardio = elevated cortisol, decreased T3 (active thyroid), and increased estrogen (fat storing hormone) = Muscle breakdown + lower thyroid function = FAT gain and muscle loss.

Is it really possible to gain fat while doing tons of exercise?

Yes. Here is what is really going. After about an hour of exercise, your cortisol levels increase and stay elevated until you have finished your extended cardio workout. Cortisol is a major body stress hormone. Exercise is stress. Thus, long duration exercise elevates cortisol for extended periods of time. Elevated cortisol is very catabolic, it breaks tissue down. Once your glycogen stores (long-chain sugar stored in the muscles) are used up, cortisol starts to mobilize (burn) not only fat, but also other tissues: muscle, organ, and bone. The longer your workout session, the longer cortisol stays elevated, the more tissue breakdown can occur.

In addition, about 30-45 minutes after you start your workout your thyroid hormones plummet.  The thyroid senses the bodies increased metabolic needs so it starts slowing many metabolic processes down (immune system, hormones, digestion) to conserve energy.  As thyroid drops, the stress hormones rise so the body can start using its own energy stores (fat, muscle, tissue).

Now, don’t get me wrong — initially the long cardio sessions will help you lose “weight”, since you will be burning fat (AND burning some muscle). But at what cost?  The cost of valuable muscle, bone, and tissue?

You are losing muscle, so your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR/how many calories your body will burn at rest) drops. Although you are burning many calories during your extended workout, you actually start to burn fewer calories while you are not working out.   Which long term means less calories burned in any given day.

Your body starts to adjusts to the longer workouts by becoming more efficient.  Which means an increase endurance fitness level, but an overall slower metabolic rate at rest. Eventually, you find you have to workout even longer to burn the same amount of calories — or you start gaining fat again. Does this sound like something you may be going through? Do you feel you have to work out longer to stay thin — or if you miss a workout the fat and weight gain is a really fast process?

To make matters worse, like I said above, without proper nutrition, during your long cardio sessions, your active form of thyroid (T3) plummets. T3 needs sugar to work properly. If you utilize all your body’s stored sugar (glycogen) for exercise and do not replenish these stored glycogen stores, T4 stops being converted to T3 in you liver. Once T3 can not be converted, your metabolism slows and your body then releases more cortisol and the cycle continues.

If your workout is making you fat…

Here are 10 things you can do to make sure you will be losing fat — not gaining — in your workout:

  1. Shorter workouts: Keep your workout sessions under 60 minutes — especially if you are a beginner.
  2. Lift: Engage in weight training to build muscle, which will increase your metabolism.
  3. HIIT: Try high intensity interval training (20-30 min workouts that are short but very intense).
  4. Eat right: If you want to train for an endurance event, make sure your nutrition is in check. It is imperative to eat the right combination of carbs, protein, and fats before, during, and after the workout to help replenish your glycogen (sugar) stores and keep your metabolism working optimally.
  5. Intensity: Work harder — not longer. Stop using long cardio sessions as a way to lose fat. Longterm, it does not work.
  6. Sleep: Get plenty of REST to help your metabolism heal.
  7. No dieting: If you are dieting while doing long cardio sessions…STOP immediately, this is killing your metabolism even more!
  8. Essential nutrients: A good diet will contain all your vitamins and minerals.  ONLY take supplement if food is not available to meet mineral and vitamin needs.
  9. Ask for help: If none of this works, or you are a little confused, ask an expert for help.
  10. Patience.  Healthy fat loss takes time, and commitment.

Do yourself a favor — allow your body to start working for you, not against you.

Get off the cardio wheel of insanity. There are far better methods for long term fat loss and leanness.

Your Optimal Health Coach,

Kate

* I do want to make a side note that there are many competitive, endurance athletes out there that are lean, muscular and fit. However, 99% of these athletes have never used their sport as a weight loss tool. They workout to compete NOT to lose fat. They eat five to ten thousand calories a day to support their metabolism and all their activity. They train at a very high aerobic threshold, usually 80-85% of their max heart rate, their sport is their life, yet trust me, if they ever stop…they will gain fat!

 

Polyunsaturated fats: Essential or toxic?

Polyunsaturated fats: Essential or toxic?

Yes, I’m back—back with even more mind-twisting information that will make you question, once again, the foods you are feeding your body.

Today’s topic — Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids — also known as PUFAs. Now, before you stop reading because you have no idea what the heck PUFAs are, and you are not interested in all this science jargon — I beg you to continue.

Why? Because you are probably consuming PUFAs everyday! The problem is, you are most likely thinking you are doing something healthful for yourself. When in fact, you may be causing your body to age faster, slowing your metabolic rate, which is making you fatter, and increasing your chances of disease. Do I have your attention now?

Good! Let’s continue.

First, what are polyunsaturated fats?

Polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) are fatty acids with many double bonds. All polyunsaturated fatty acids lack several hydrogen atoms. This makes them far less stable than a fully saturated fatty acid. This instability produces a molecule that is more susceptible to being attacked and damaged by free radicals. Free radical damage can cause accelerated aging, hormone imbalance, cancer, and immune disorders. Yikes!

So what oils contain polyunsaturated fats?

Well, to be honest ALL oils contain some amount of PUFAs.

Here is a list of oils that have the highest concentration and can be the most harmful:

Soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil, grapeseed oil, sesame seed, nut oils (peanut, walnut, almond, etc), flaxseed, fish oil, cod liver oil, evening primrose, borage oils, and yes, this even includes Omega-3 and Omega-6 (also known as the “essential fatty acids”).

What!! I know you are thinking. “I thought these oils were good for me? I thought these oils were “heart healthy” according to the USDA, my doctor, and my registered dietitian? How could they possibly be bad for me?” Yes, I know it is a little mind boggling, especially considering the massive marketing push on fish oils, flax, and cod liver oils. Trust me — it took me months and months of research to wrap my brain around it, especially since I used to be an avid fish oil user. So let’s go back about 80 years ago so you can understand what has happened.

Back in 1929 George and Mildred Burrs published a paper claiming that polyunsaturated fats are essential for the prevention of several diseases and essential for health. Burrs study concluded that rats that ingested unsaturated fats were far healthier than the rats that were on a fat free diet. Which, in fact, was true.

However, over 10 years later The Clayton Foundation Biochemical Institute found that “Burr’s disease” was actually a vitamin B6 deficiency. Back in 1929 the B vitamins were not yet discovered. The new research explained that the PUFAs had actually slowed down the metabolism of the PUFA-fed rats, causing a decreased need for nutrients. Thus, this allowed them to not be as nutrient deficient as the fat-free diet rats. The non-PUFA-fed rats had a higher metabolic rate, and with that comes an increase in nutrient demand, especially the B vitamins. And since the demand was not met, the rats became sick. Basically, all Burrs showed was that PUFAs slow your metabolic rate down, allowing you to survive on less nutrients. Thus the PUFAs prevented a deficiency on a deficient diet. Interesting, huh?

Think of your body like an engine. A high powered engine (high metabolic rate) needs premium gasoline and oils (the right carbs, fats, and proteins) to run optimally. If you give your high powered engine cheap gas and oil (PUFAs) it will slow down, causing damage, and eventually early engine death. Now, this is not to say a slower, smaller, lower powered engine (lower metabolic rate) could not survive on the cheap gas and oils — but it would NEVER run at the speed, strength, or longevity. Making sense? Basically, do you want to run like a Ferrari or a Ford Fiesta?

This may explain why people who eat a diet primarily of nuts, seeds, and vegetables can live a long life. Their metabolism is actually slower, so they have less nutritional requirements, which allows their body to live on very little food. The problem is these people usually have less energy, drive, motivation, and vitality. Ever seen a “healthy” looking vegan? I sure haven’t. In fact, most complain of low sex drive, low energy, muscle loss, low motivation, and sleep problems.

Here are some other things to think about.

Back in the 1940’s, farmers attempted to use coconut oil (a saturated fat) to fatten their animals. But then they found it only made them lean, active, and hungry. You see, coconut oil is a food that makes the body highly metabolic. It actually increases your bodies ability to burn fat. Farmers soon found that corn and soy oils, both almost entirely PUFAs, could be used to fatten their livestock. Why? Because corn and soy oils are fattening agents. Remember, PUFAs slow down your metabolism. This lower metabolic rate allows these animals to gain weight faster, which allows farmers to spend less money to get their animals fat faster. We must remember farmers don’t care about having the oldest, healthiest living animals — they just care about producing the fattest animals the fastest way possible.

Another interesting fact is this:

Bears and squirrels hibernate in the winter. They do this by eating a high level of nuts, seeds, and berries before hibernation. These nuts and seeds with their high PUFA levels allow the metabolic rate of these animals to slow, allowing them to sleep through the cold months of the year. Researchers have found that bears and squirrels given coconut oil (saturated fat) and the right carbohydrates were unable to hibernate since the animals had an increased metabolic rate and energy level.

And finally…

By 1950 it was established that PUFAs suppress the metabolic rate, and apparently cause hypothyroidism. Researchers found that PUFAs damage the mitochondria of cells, suppressing respiratory enzymes, and promote excessive oxidative damage in the body. The more PUFAs one eats, the higher the suppression of tissue response to thyroid hormone, the lower the metabolic rate, and the more weight gain. This is one reason hospitals feed soy oil emulsions to cancer patients — to prevent weight loss!

But Kate… I thought these oils, especially the Omega 3’s and 6’s (EFA), caused a decrease in cholesterol and were heart healthy!

Yes, there is a cholesterol-lowering effect with the essential oils. It’s true. The question is, how are they doing this, and is this actually good for us long-term? In the book Generative Energy by Dr Ray Peat, he discusses how these “essential fatty acids” (EFAs) actually suppress the immune system by suppressing the cells that cause inflammation. Remember that cholesterol is part of our immune system, it is elevated by the liver when our bodies are in a state of inflammation to help protect our cells. However, just like statin drugs, all the EFAs are doing is suppressing a symptom. They are not correcting the actual problem. Long-term, these EFAs cause immune suppression, kill white blood cells, and inhibit proteolytic enzymes that are needed for proper metabolic function.

Does your brain hurt yet?

Ok, so if PUFAs in vegetable oils and nuts are so bad for us, what should we eat?

There are others, but here are my top 10.

  1. Eat saturated fats. Coconut oil, butter, ghee, coconut milk.
  2. Eat root vegetables. Sweet potatoes, beets, carrots (all root vegetables have very little PUFAs).
  3. Eat fruits and fruit-like vegetables. Papayas, apples, pears, peaches, squash, tomatoes, zucchini, etc.
  4. Eat grass-fed meats. Corn- and soy-fed meats have a higher PUFA content. Beef, bison, lamb.
  5. Consume organic, grass-fed dairy. Milk, cheese, yogurt.
  6. Consume tropical nuts. Macadamia, hazelnut, and cashew (in limited quantities).
  7. Eat free-range, pastured, organic eggs. Corn- and soy-fed chickens produce higher PUFA content eggs.
  8. Consume gelatin and beef broth. Both are non-inflammatory proteins and easily digested.
  9. Eat wild white fish and shellfish. Halibut, cod, sole, shrimp, oysters, and crab.
  10. Once a week eat grass-fed organ meats. Organ meats in limited quantities are full of vitamin and minerals.

*Please understand these are basic recommendations. Everyone is different, so different things work for different people. However, one of the biggest recommendations I would say works across the board is getting rid of as many PUFAs out of your diet as you can…unless of course you want to get fatter, sicker, and look older.

To be honest, I am certainly not asking any of you to take the things I am saying as the absolutely truth. I am just asking you to consider another side of things, so you can ask yourself if what you are doing is truly working. My goal in these blogs is not to tell you what to do. My goal is to only educate you. It is up to you to find out what works for you and what does not. It is up to you ask for help, if you are lost and confused. It is up to you to take an active role in your health and life.

For me and many of my clients, applying this science-based philosophy has been life changing. It does work, but it takes time and commitment and a willingness to change not only your body but your mindset. Real change takes work. There are no easy solutions, yet if you are ready, there is help. Call me to set up a 30 minute FREE consultation. It’s time you start feeling better!

Your Optimal Health Coach,

Kate

“Disclaimer:  I am an exercise physiologist, personal trainer, nutritional and lifestyle coach, not a medical doctor.  I do not diagnose, prescribe for, treat or claim to prevent, mitigate or cure any human disease or physical problem. I do not provide diagnosis, care treatment or rehabilitation of individuals, nor apply medical, mental health or human development principles.  I do not prescribe prescription drugs nor do I tell you to discontinue them.  I provide physical and dietary suggestions to improve health and wellness and to nourish and support normal function and structure of the body.  If you suspect any disease please consult your physician.”

References:

Josh Rubin www.eastwesthealing.com

Dr Lita Lee www.Drlitalee.com “Unsaturated Fats”

Dr Ray Peat www.Raypeat.com “Unsaturated fatty acids: Nutritionally essential, or toxic?”, “Unsaturated Vegetable Oils: Toxic”, “Coconut Oil”

Dr Ray Peat Mind and Tissues

Dr Ray Peat Generative Energy

Dr Ray Peat Nutrition for Women

 

Is Your Metabolism Broken?

Is Your Metabolism Broken?

Is your metabolism working at an optimal level? Do you know?

Lately, It has come to my attention that most people’s metabolisms are operating at a below optimal level of function. They’re trying to lose weight and get healthy, while their body’s internal system for weight loss is… well… broken.

Trying to lose weight with a low metabolism or broken system is like trying to run a race with a broken leg. You could do — but it will be much harder, and in the end you will most likely do more harm than good. Therefore, wouldn’t it make more sense to heal the leg first, and THEN run the race? I think so. The problem is most people don’t go through this healing process when trying to lose weight. They try running the race (try losing weight) with the broken leg (low functioning metabolism). And yes, with a lot of persistence, willpower, and food deprivation, some end up losing a little weight — only to find in time that they cannot live with this deprived lifestyle for long. So they put all the original weight back on — and then some.

I think Diane Schwarzbein, MD (author of The Schwarzbein Principle) said it best:

“You have to get healthy to lose weight — not lose weight to get healthy.”

Health is not defined by weight loss, how lean you are, or how fast you can run. True heath is defined as being free of illness, injury, pain, a warm body, good sleep, happiness, good digestion, and an ability to stay lean without countless hours of exercise.

If you have a damaged metabolism, then you are not healthy. If your metabolism is damaged, you need to focus on healing if first — then try to lose weight.

So, how do you know if your metabolism is running at a sub-optimal level?

Oh, I’m so glad you asked. Here is the abbreviated list:

  1. Weight. You have a hard time losing weight, and/or you gain weight easily. If you’re eating a low-calorie diet (1200- 1500 calories), you should lose weight easily if your metabolism is running at a high, optimal level. Unfortunately, most people who have been on a low-calorie diet are already metabolically damaged. So when they continue to diet further, they only lower the metabolic rate more. As to why highly calorie-restrictive diets never work long-term.
  2. Body temp. You have a chronically low body temperature. In the book, Hypothyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness, the author (Broda Barnes, MD) explains how measuring body temperature is a fairly accurate way to judge optimal metabolic function.

Try this simple test:

Get a body thermometer. Digital is best — mercury is fine. First thing in the morning before you get out of bed, check your body temperature. Your morning body temperature should be between 97.8 and 98.2 degrees. Then check it again about 20 minutes after lunch — at this time your temperature should be around 98.6 degrees or higher. I will bet most of you will be below these temperatures. Before I started to heal my body, I was 96.5 to 97.0 in the morning and never above 97.5 mid day. It took me months and months of decreased activity and the proper diet to heal my metabolism. Honestly, healing and staying health are a  never-ending process.  In time, my body temperatures rose to a healthy 98.6 degrees…I still have my ups and downs…but Im far more UP, then years ago.

  1. Pulse. You have a low pulse. Broda Barnes, MD and Dr. Ray Peat both state that an optimal pulse is between 75 to 85 beats per minute (BPM). “Huh? I thought a low pulse was better? Don’t most athletes have a pulse rate below 60 BPM? I think super-fit Lance Armstrong has a pulse of like 45 BPM.” Yes, Lance is “super fit”, and yes he had a very low pulse rate. Yet, let’s remember, he had testicular cancer at the ripe age of 25. We must remember — “fit” does not equal “healthy”. A healthy metabolism induces a higher pulse rate and body temperature — two things you will frequently NOT see in endurance athletes.

Other symptoms that may occur with a sub-optimal metabolism are:

  1. Cold hands and feet
  2.  Anemia
  3.  Depression
  4.  Arthritis
  5.  Skin issues (eczema, psoriasis, and acne)
  6.  PMS
  7.  High cholesterol
  8.  High blood pressure
  9.  Low sex drive
  10.  Low energy
  11.  Edema (swelling/water weight)
  12.  Constipation or diarrhea
  13.  Diabetes
  14.  Muscle pain
  15.  Joint pain
  16.  Pale skin
  17. Brittle nails
  18.  Poor liver function
  19.  Digestive issues
  20.  Allergies
  21.  Food intolerances or sensitivities
  22.  Heart disease
  23.  Cancer
  24. …the list goes on and on

Whew! As you see, a lot can happen when you are running at a subpar metabolic level. I am sure many of you would admit that you have many of the above issues — right? I did. In fact, before my healing process, I had the following: Low body temperature, low pulse, cold hands and feet, anemia, high cholesterol, low energy, digestive issues, muscle pain, joint pain, allergies, and the “blahs” — good times. And yes, at the time, I considered myself VERY healthy. I had no idea the damage I had done (overtraining and under-nourishing), until all the things I was doing just were not working anymore.

I know many of you are identifying with what I’m saying. I know so many of you are depressed, getting sick, feeling like crap, and can’t seem to lose weight. And, I know how you feel when everything you are trying so hard to do (all the “right” things) and nothing seems to be working — right?

The good news is you can heal your broken metabolism. There are many things you can do now for healing your metabolism and getting back on track. And as always — don’t expect it to be instant. It’s a process and it takes some time.

Here is a basic list of how you can heal your metabolism:

  1.  Saturated fat. Eat more saturated fat (organic butter, coconut oil, ghee, cream).
  2.  The right proteins. Eat the right amount and right kind of protein for you. At least 80 grams, but could be upwards of 200 grams depending on your lifestyle, exercise, size, stress, and goals. This includes shellfish, white fish, eggs, dairy, grass-fed meats, gelatin, and broth.
  3.  Avoid PUFA. Remove polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) from your diet. This includes (but is not limited to) soybean oil, sesame oil, canola oil, grapeseed oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, nut oils, and margarine. All PUFAs are anti-thyroid.
  4.  Root veggies. Eat more vegetables that are grown below the ground. Mainly root vegetables (potatoes, carrots, beets, etc).
  5.  Avoid additives, processed foods, and grains. Remove all toxic food additives, hormones, pesticides, antibiotics, food chemicals, processed foods, fast foods, alcohol, soy, and grains and grain-based foods.
  6.  Organic Dairy. Drink organic whole milk or lower fat diary. Raw if it is available
  7.  Sugar-fat-protein balance. Consume the right sugars with the right combination of fat and protein to help heal the pancreas and liver. This includes ripe and in-season, non-starch fruits, honey, organic dairy products, and orange juice.
  8.  Eat organic often. Eat quality organic food in small frequent meals.
  9.  You-tailored exercise. Do the right kind of exercise that’s tailored to your body to help it heal. For some, this may mean weight training, short intense interval training, yoga, or walking. For others this may mean doing nothing at all. Since exercise is stress, if your system is overburdened, then even the smallest amount of exercise can be too much. Remember, exercise is a prescription.
  10.  Smart supplementation. Take the right supplements, if any. Food is always best, but in some cases supplementation can be beneficial until your body can heal.

Now, I understand I am going to get some flak for some of my suggestions for healing the metabolism. Eat sugar? Drink juice? Consume whole-fat dairy? Don’t avoid saturated fat? Eat potatoes? What?! I can hear what you’re thinking, “This is the opposite of everything I have been told!”

Yes, I am very aware that many of these recommendations go against what is being taught today in terms of weight loss and health advice.  However, when you really start to understand the physiology of how the body works, my recommendations make perfect sense.  (I will fully explain this in each of my programs).  In addition, let’s remember — in today’s world we have the highest rate of obesity, metabolic issues, depression, pain, inflammatory disorders, and so on. Thus, is what we are doing really working?

I am certainly not here to convince you to go against what you believe in — especially if it is working for you. I am only here to share with you what I have been learning, what I have found that is working for me, and what I am using to help many of my clients. Only you can decide if you are ready for change and ready to try a new approach.

Sometimes to get better, we must unlearn so much of what has been hammered into our minds and become part of our belief systems. We must actually take a few steps back before we can move forward. Remember, obtaining optimal health is a journey — there is no clear path and it’s not instant. Yet it can be obtained if you are open to learning, growing, and being patient. A little confused? Good — this means your thoughts and beliefs are being challenged. And only then can you actually be open to learning something new.

Please understand the recommendations I have given here are VERY general. Every plan I develop is far more comprehensive, educational, and person-specific (customized to you and your body and lifestyle). If you are interested in learning more on how to heal your metabolism and get on the right track to optimal health, order my book, “How to Heal Your Metabolism”.

Your Optimal Health Coach,

Kate

“Disclaimer:  I am an exercise physiologist, personal trainer, nutritional and lifestyle coach, not a medical doctor.  I do not diagnose, prescribe for, treat or claim to prevent, mitigate or cure any human disease or physical problem. I do not provide diagnosis, care treatment or rehabilitation of individuals, nor apply medical, mental health or human development principles.  I do not prescribe prescription drugs nor do I tell you to discontinue them.  I provide physical and dietary suggestions to improve health and wellness and to nourish and support normal function and structure of the body.  If you suspect any disease please consult your physician.”

___________________________________

References:

Hypo-thyroidism: The Unsuspected Illness. Broda Barnes, MD

Hypothyroidism Type 2. Mark Starr, MD

www.Raypeat.com Dr Ray Peat

Eat Move and Be Healthy. Paul Chek

www.eastwesthealing.com Josh Rubin

The Schwarzbein Principle. Diane Schwarzbein, MD