Kate Deering

Kate Deering

Personal Trainer / Fitness & Nutrition Coach

For over 20 years Kate Deering has been involved in the health and fitness industry helping men and women of all ages achieve optimal health and wellness. Read More…

Nuts and seeds…Too much of a good thing?

Nuts and seeds…Too much of a good thing? For years, nuts and seeds were a BIG part of my diet.  Nuts, seeds, nut and seed bars, and nut butters were staples when it came to my everyday food plan.   I ate almond butter in my oatmeal in the morning, a bag of nuts for a snack, a few nuts on my salad for lunch and a scoop of peanut butter in my protein shake later on in the day.  Nuts and seeds, seeds and nuts…how could you lose with such a tasty nutritious snack? The only problem, were some digestive issues: stomach bloating and seeing the undigested nuts and seeds in my stool (I know…too much information).  Quite honestly, I didn’t think much about any of these things because I knew how healthy they were for me. I thought of nuts and seeds as a good source of protein, filled with anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals…plus they were convenient and tasted great… right? These days, almost every-health conscious person loves their nuts and seeds.   Almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and walnuts… these crunchy, tasty snacks go great with any salad, casserole or just eaten by themselves as a snack.  Eating nuts and seeds has become a staple for individuals who want a healthy snack, that’s easy and taste great. BUT — (you knew there was going to be a BUT)—have any of you, like me, ever had digestive upset, bloating or undigested nuts and seeds in your stool?  I’ll guess most of you will say “yes,” and for those of you that said “no”, you may... read more

How To Heal Your Metabolism

How to Heal Your Metabolism Lately, as many of you know I have been deep in reading and researching about the systems of the body, healing the body, nutrients, foods that heal and how they are all related in increasing metabolic function.  I think we can agree that we would all like to increase our metabolism…right?  As we get older we are led to believe that our metabolism will just naturally slow down.  We will have to work harder and eat less just to stay thin and feel good about ourselves.  Do these statements ring true to you?  They certainly did for me…of course, until now. You see, for many years, I believed the only way that I could increase my metabolic expenditure (increase calories burned) was to add more muscle to my body and/or to exert more energy through increased exercise load and intensity.  However, there is actually a third way to increase your metabolism.  One that is not discussed very often, either because people do not know about it or they just do not understand it.  Are you wondering what it is?  Oh, I bet you are… Over the last few years of my studies, I have begun to look at the body and its functions very differently.  I have realized that the health of our metabolism is more than just how much we move and how much muscle we have; a healthy metabolism is about what is happening in every cell of our body and the actual respiration of every cell of our body.  Thus, if we can increase cellular respiration we can increase metabolic function.... read more

Facebook Posts

Harvard Medical's thoughts on fish oil supplements..

"If you are taking them on your own because you believe they are good for you, it’s time to rethink that strategy.

In November 2018, a study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine found that omega-3 fatty acid supplements did nothing to reduce heart attacks, strokes, or deaths from heart disease in middle-age men and women without any known risk factors for heart disease. Earlier research reported in the same journal in 2013 also reported no benefit in people with risk factors for heart disease."

"The early evidence for fish oil supplements looked promising. But over the past 15 years, many trials have compared them with placebos. There is no evidence that taking fish oil supplements offers any benefit for people prone to cardiovascular disease, including those with diabetes, atrial fibrillation, or stroke."

"A recent summary of the use of fish oil supplements, published in JAMA Cardiology, concluded there was no heart benefit for people with or without existing heart disease. Other uses for fish oil remain popular but also have proved disappointing in studies. For instance, recent trials have found that supplemental fish oil does not relieve symptoms of dry eye or help ease arthritis pain and inflammation."

www.health.harvard.edu/…/are-there-any-health-benef…
www.health.harvard.edu/…/should-you-consider-taking…
www.health.harvard.edu/…/fish-oil-friend-or-foe-201…
Image: Bigstock
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook