Why I love saturated fat…

My saturated fat story… If there is one thing you should know about me it is this — I have always been a health freak and a workout queen — and I have loved every minute of it. I knew from the moment I started walking that a sitting job was never going to work for me. Thus, I think I was born to be the athlete-personal trainer-fitness-nutrition freak that I am today.   You know, your basic super hero.. Fast forward a few decades to about a year ago, I was training for 3 or 4 half-marathons, a possible half Iron Man triathlon, and a few 10-hour hikes — crazy, yet normal for me at that time of my life. I thought my body was healthy, so I could do anything…right? Nope. Unfortunately, at the end of 2010, I incurred a nasty groin strain. This was not my first injury, but this was the first injury that was absolutely relentless — and alarmingly, it was not healing. About the same time, my body started to feel chronically tired, I gained a few pounds, and I was feeling “blah” — not a good state for a fitness professional. I went to every doctor, massage therapist, chiropractor, orthopedic professional, physical therapist, acupuncturist, voodoo-ist I could find (ok, I didn’t do voodoo, but I considered it). Each appointment would help for a bit, yet nothing seemed to completely heal me. I felt “off”, and I started to become totally frustrated. I am a nutritionist, so I knew I was eating right. I was trying to stay less active (Ok, I did the...

Demonizing Saturated fats…did we make a mistake?

Demonizing saturated fats…did we make a mistake? More than ever, it seems people today are confused on what to eat and what is truth. With so much conflicting information AND changing of nutrition advice, we are all at a loss as to what is actually healthy for us and what is not. I know my head is constantly spinning. The truth is, overall, we really don’t know that much about food, nutrition, hormonal response to foods, and how this all affects our physiology. Nutrition is such a new science — we’ve barely touched the surface as to the power it has over our health and wellbeing. And we’ve mislabeled good things as bad and bad things as good over time. We learn as we go and as we take a deeper look at the old and new data. With that said, today I want to talk about a very controversial topic — saturated fat. You know, the evil, artery clogging, heart attack promoting stuff that most doctors tell you to eliminate from your diet or lower as much as possible. Today I want to present another side to the saturated fat story. I want to discuss with you (with studies to back up what I’m saying) why I believe saturated fat has undeservingly received a bad reputation. I will discuss why saturated fat can actually be very beneficial to you — why we have been brainwashed into thinking it is unhealthful and why you should start incorporating it back into your daily diet. First, what are saturated fats? Saturated fats are chains of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen that are...

The Great Egg Debate

Much like the milk and meat controversy, the egg debate has been going on for years. One day, eggs are a major power protein. The next day, they are as bad for you as cigarette smoking. Just last month, national headlines reported, “Egg yolks almost as bad as smoking”, “Eggs Are Nearly as Bad for Your Arteries as Cigarettes”, and finally, “What do egg yolks and cigarettes have in common?” We are once again left confused, and wondering if that three-egg omelet is really a good idea after all? Recently, a research study by Dr. David Spence, a professor at Western University of Ontario Canada, proclaimed that eating egg yolks regularly (at least 4.5/week) was 2/3 as bad as smoking. Yes, you heard it: eating eggs could kill you almost as fast as puffing away on a pack of Marlboros. Dr. Spence questioned 1,231 elderly men and women from the London Health Science Center, who were recovering stroke patients, on their egg consumption, smoking habits, medications and other lifestyle habits. Ultrasound was then used to measure the amount of plaque build-up in each of the patients. The study found that those who ate more egg yolks per week had almost 2/3 the plague build-up of heavy smokers. The study showed that those who smoked the most and ate the most egg yolks had the most plaque build-up. In comparison, those who smoked the least and ate the least amount of yolks had far less plaque build up. The study also concluded that those who smoked the most also ate the most egg yolks. Apparently, in this study, it seems...